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Open Source Geospatial Lab established at CAGIS, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA

News Date: 
13 Sep 2013
Details: 

We are pleased to announce the establishment of ICA-OSGeo Lab at the Center for Applied GIScience (CAGIS), University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC), USA. CAGIS is an interdisciplinary research center that focuses on using advanced space-time theories, methods, and technologies in cutting-edge Geographic Information Science for complex geographical problem-solving. Based on the synergistic coupling of spatiotemporal and computational thinking, major research themes of CAGIS consist of 1) CyberGIS for large-scale geographical problem-solving, 2) Land use/cover change and sustainability, 3) Complexity theory and geospatial modeling, 4) Big data and space-time analytics, 5) Remote sensing, sensor networks and volunteered geographic information, 6) Computational intelligence for geocomputational modeling, 7) Cartography and geovisualization, and 8) Open source GIS. CAGIS has unique strength in these cutting-edge research themes and has intensive interest in their applications in alternative spatially integrated domains, including environmental studies, ecology, earth science, hydrology, spatial epidemiology, social science, transportation, urban regional analysis and policies. More details at http://gis.uncc.edu .

This open source geospatial laboratory is a joint initiative of the International Cartographic Association (ICA) and the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo). The lab will be led by Dr. Wenwu Tang (Executive director of CAGIS) and Dr. Xingjian Liu with support from two full-time permanent positions: Director of Research & Outreach (John B. Vogler) and Resident Systems Administrator (Jason Watson). The facility has a well-equipped computational laboratory specializing in technologies for spatial analysis and geocomputation, spatial cyberinfrastructure, and big spatial data. It has also has access to advanced supercomputing computing resources held by US NSF XSEDE, Open Science Grid, RENCI (Renaissance Computing Institute), and URC (University Research Computing) at UNC Charlotte.

OSGeo is a not-for-profit organisation founded in 2006 whose mission is to support and promote the collaborative development of open source geospatial technologies and data.

ICA is the world authoritative body for cartography, the discipline dealing with the conception, production, dissemination and study of maps.

GeoMoose Graduates Incubation

News Date: 
6 Sep 2013
Details: 

OSGeo is pleased to announce that the GeoMoose project has graduated from incubation and is now a full fledged OSGeo project. Brian Fischer , a long time member of the GeoMoose Project Steering Committee (PSC), has been appointed as Project Officer.

GeoMoose is an Open Source Web Client JavaScript Framework for displaying distributed GIS data. GeoMoose excels at creating a useful web-based GIS application for those who need something that works without any programming experience. The GeoMoose demo (available on the GeoMoose website) contains a fully operating web-based property viewer. It can render, investigate, and even edit layers without the need to write a single line of code.

GeoMoose is written using JavaScript and HTML. XML configuration files are used to allow configuration too meet the needs of a variety of common web-based GIS viewers. Besides the viewer, GeoMoose also comes prepackaged with a number of built in geospatial services written in PHP. These services add the ability to perform drill-down identify operations, selection operations, and search data sets. GeoMoose leverages other open source projects such as MapServer, OpenLayers, Proj4js and Dojo Toolkit to take advantage of other project’s hard work that has went into those projects.

Graduating incubation includes fulfilling requirements for open community operation, a responsible project governance model, code provenance, and general good project operation. Graduation is the OSGeo seal of approval for a project and gives potential users and the community at large an added confidence in the viability and safety of the project.

As officially sanctioned software, GeoMoose will be a featured project on the OSGeo website and joins MapServer (www.mapserver.org) as only the second program with Minnesota origins to be endorsed by OSGeo. GeoMoose software is downloadable for free, and is useable based on a MIT open source license.

Congratulations to the GeoMoose community!

First ICA-OSGeo Lab in Switzerland established at SUPSI

News Date: 
3 Sep 2013
Details: 

We are pleased to announce that the first Open Source Geospatial Lab in Switzerland is established at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland (SUPSI).

In a society marked by profound changes, the University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland (SUPSI) produces, develops and disseminates knowledge and expertise as propellant forces fundamental to support the economic, social, technological and artistic progress, and to contribute to the cultural and ethical growth of both society as a whole and its individual members. In this context, the Institute of Earth Sciences (IST) is a historical research and education institution, integrated in SUPSI and mainly involved in activities strictly related to the environment and its characteristics. It is composed of specialists in management of surface water and groundwater, natural hazards assessment, geological analyses, environmental databases, natural resource monitoring and geographic information systems (GIS). The geomatics division at the IST is particularly active in the field of the open source software, open standard and management of real time data collected from automatic monitoring network.

This open source geospatial laboratory is a joint initiative of the International Cartographic Association (ICA) and the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo). The lab will be led by Professor Massimiliano Cannata. He also leads the Division of Geomatics.

Massimiliano is also an OSGeo Charter member and an active member of the open source geospatial community. His laboratory is also the developer of the Free and Open Source Sensor Observation Service Data Management System( istSOS ) which implements the SOS standard. Details at http://istgeo.ist.supsi.ch/software/istsos/

OSGeo is a not-for-profit organisation founded in 2006 whose mission is to support and promote the collaborative development of open source geospatial technologies and data.


ICA is the world authoritative body for cartography, the discipline dealing with the conception, production, dissemination and study of maps.

Ohio's First Open Source Geospatial lab will be established at Kent State University

News Date: 
30 Aug 2013
Details: 

Kent State University will be home to Ohio's first Open Source Geospatial Laboratory. The laboratory will support computational social science research and educational excellence through the development, implementation, and application of open source geo-computation and geo-visualization.

The laboratory is expected to attract considerable interest from spatial scientists, economic/urban geographers, regional scientists, and policy-makers who are keen to contribute to and learn about the evaluation, extension, and implementation of multi-scale and multi-mechanism framework for comparative space-time analysis of regional and urban dynamics. The laboratory will be active in dissemination of new comparative metrics for the broader research community.
The software used to support most activities of the laboratory is open source, meaning the source code can be modified and re-distributed royalty and fee free. This open source geospatial laboratory is a joint initiative of the International Cartographic Association (ICA) and the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

Professor Xinyue Ye, GIS Faculty at Kent State University and founding director of computational social science research lab will lead the initiative.
The facility will open in September 2013.

Further Information:
Dr Xinyue Ye
Director, Computational Social Science Lab
Department of Geography
Kent State University
Email: xye5 AT kent.edu

OSGeo is a not-for-profit organisation founded in 2006 whose mission is to support and promote the collaborative development of open source geospatial technologies and data.


ICA is the world authoritative body for cartography, the discipline dealing with the conception, production, dissemination and study of maps.

Stable GRASS GIS 6.4.3 released - Birthday release for 30 years of GRASS GIS

News Date: 
30 Jul 2013
Details: 

We are pleased to announce the release of a new stable version of GRASS GIS. This release fixes bugs discovered in 6.4.2 version of the program and adds a number of new features. This release includes over
830 updates to the source code since 6.4.2. As a stable release series, the 6.4 line will enjoy long-term support and incremental enhancements while preserving backwards-compatibility with the entire GRASS 6 line.

Key improvements of this release include some new functionality (assistance for topologically unclean vector data), major speedup for some vector modules, fixes in the vector network modules, fixes for the wxPython based portable graphical interface (attribute table management, wxNVIZ, and Cartographic Composer). A number of new modules have been added for processing LANDSAT and MODIS satellite data, and a new vector statistics module is also introduced. Many new symbols and north arrows are available, and the user will find an improved and easier to use wizard for creating custom project locations with precise map projection and datum support. Community-contributed add-on modules are now more easily and robustly installed from an online archive. Other major developments include enhancements to the Python scripting library and numerous software-compatibility fixes and translation updates. Important is the enhanced portability for MS-Windows (native support, fixes in case of missing system DLLs). And we welcome Romanian as our twenty-fourth language!

Source code download:

Binaries download:

  • ... further packages will follow shortly.


To get the GRASS GIS 6.4.3 source code directly from SVN:
svn checkout http://svn.osgeo.org/grass/grass/tags/release_20130727_grass_6_4_3

See also our detailed announcement:
http://trac.osgeo.org/grass/wiki/Release/6.4.3-News

First time users should explore the first steps tutorial after installation.

About GRASS GIS
GRASS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System) is a free and open source Geographic Information System (GIS) software suite used for geospatial data management and analysis, image processing, graphics and map production, spatial modeling, and 3D visualization. GRASS GIS is currently used in academic and commercial settings around the world, as well as by many governmental agencies and environmental consulting companies. GRASS GIS can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics. It is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

Today marks 30 years of GRASS GIS development

News Date: 
29 Jul 2013
Details: 

Today the Free Software community celebrates the 30th birthday of GRASS GIS! GRASS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System) is a free and open source Geographic Information System (GIS) software suite used for geospatial data management and analysis, image processing, graphics and map production, spatial modeling, and 3D visualization. GRASS GIS is currently used in academic and commercial settings around the world, as well as by many governmental agencies and environmental consulting companies. GRASS GIS can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics. It is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) and can be freely downloaded at http://grass.osgeo.org/download/software/.

Brief history

In 1982, Lloyd Van Warren, a University of Illinois engineering student, began development on a new computer program based on a master's thesis by Jim Westervelt that described a GIS package called LAGRID – the Landscape Architecture Gridcell analysis system. Thirty years ago, on 29 July 1983, the user manual for this new system titled "GIS Version 1 Reference Manual" was first published by J. Westervelt and M. O'Shea. The software continued its development at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (USA/CERL) in Champaign, Illinois; and after further expansion version 1.0 was released in 1985 under the name Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (GRASS). The GRASS GIS community was established the same year with the first annual user meeting and the launch of GRASSnet, one of the internet's early mailing lists. The user community expanded to a larger audience in 1991 with the "Grasshopper" mailing list and the introduction of the World Wide Web. The users' and programmers' mailing lists archives for these early years are still available online.
In the mid 1990s the development transferred from USA/CERL to The Open GRASS Consortium (a group who would later generalize to become today's Open Geospatial Consortium -- the OGC). The project coordination eventually shifted to the actual international development team made up of governmental and academic researchers and university scientists. Reflecting this shift to a project run by the users, for the users, in 1999 GRASS GIS was released the first time under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). A detailed history of GRASS GIS can be found at http://grass.osgeo.org/history/.

Since these early days GRASS development has progressed and grown, adjusting with and often at the forefront of new technologies as they became available. Today GRASS's software development is maintained by a team of domain experts as visualized in this beautiful new video animation which stylistically details the codebase evolution and modifications from 1999 through to 2013, up to and including the latest GRASS GIS 6.4.3 stable release.

30 years of active growth: where are we now?

Recent versions of GRASS GIS come with exciting new features like:

  • A new modern graphical user interface complete with integrated workflow-wizards and interactive tools,
  • A new Python interface to the core C geoprocessing libraries, permitting Python developers to create powerful new modules in a quick and simple way,
  • Fully-fledged topological vector support for editing and tools for topological analysis and data cleaning,
  • Hundreds of new modules to analyze raster and vector data of all scales and types, with hundreds more contributed in an active community repository,
  • Support for massive data processing (e.g. relevant for LiDAR processing) and Large File Support (> 2GB, 64-bit files on 32-bit systems),
  • A codebase portable to all of today's major Operating Systems,
  • Installed on everything from low-power dataloggers and field laptops to high performance Grid Engines and TOP500 supercomputers.

GRASS GIS is currently developed by a global team of around twenty core programmers, plus numerous add-on contributors, testers, and translators. Overall, more than seventy core developers have worked on the code in the past thirty years, making over fifty-thousand modifications to the code. All the while, hundreds more have provided peer review and improvements to algorithms and documentation while using GRASS GIS in professional, educational, and research contexts.

Where to next?

Development on GRASS GIS continues with as much energy and interest as ever. Version 6.4.3 has been released as a birthday present. Parallel to the long-term maintenance of the GRASS 6 stable series, effort is well underway on the new cutting-edge major release, GRASS GIS 7, bringing with it many new features, modules, enhancements, and cleanups. As in the past, the GRASS GIS community is open to any contribution, be it in the form of programming, documentation, testing, financial sponsorship or any other form of support.

--
http://grass.osgeo.org/
M. Neteler (GRASS GIS PSC Chair) and GRASS Development Team