OSGeo Planet

gvSIG Team: Material didáctico “Introducción gvSIG para uso policial”

OSGeo Planet - 5 hours 28 min ago

Esta disponible para descarga la documentación del curso Introducción gvSIG para uso policial.

00_crime

El curso comienza desde cero, asumiendo que el alumno no tiene conocimientos del manejo de Sistemas de Información Geográfica, y mediante el uso de gvSIG se van aprendiendo los diferentes conceptos y herramientas necesarias para realizar análisis espacial en el ámbito policial.

Este curso, realizado por Pau Aragó Galindo, se enmarca dentro de las actividades de la Cátedra Eurocop de Prevención del Delito que se hicieron en Culiacán (México).

El índice de materiales es:

  • Introducción a los Sistemas de Información Geográfica.
  • Primeros pasos con gvSIG. Taller de introducción al gvSIG.
  • Trabajando con tablas. Creación de capas.
  • Geoprocesos.
  • Cloud GIS o el SIG en la nube.

Desde la Asociación gvSIG queremos agradecer la publicación de este material que además enlaza con la propuesta de crear un producto vertical basado en gvSIG para criminología (gvSIG Crime).


Filed under: gvSIG Desktop, spanish Tagged: criminología, gvSIG Crime, policia
Categories: OSGeo Planet

gvSIG Team: Publishing extension: Project upload to the server

OSGeo Planet - 8 hours 7 min ago

The publishing extension is able to upload to the server any project generated in local.

Visually, the menu is very similar to the publishing tool, except for the fact that all that refers to the generation of the project have disappeared, because it will not generate the definition of any other service, only it will upload an already existing one. Therefore, we need to indicate the local project folder which we want to upload to the server and set the connection parameters.

Advanced options: Server connection by WebDAV

This process of publishing the project generated on the server can be done automatically at the time the project is created, or can be upload after with another tool extension.

In the first case (automatically), you need to indicate the destination address to establish the WebDAV connection. If it is a directory authentication, you must also provide the username and password.

E01_Publish

With all the information provided, the ‘Connect‘ button will check that connection and also it will fill the left menu with the subfolders that exist in the specified path.

Advanced options: Paths

For a correct operation of services, it is necessary that the access to resources are properly defined. To do this, there are three possibilities to define the routes to them:

E02_publish

  • Default paths: This option does not alter the paths to resources, setting them such in the definition files of the different services..

  • Absolute paths: adequate if there is a correspondence between the location of the files on both machines (eg, the shapes are inside a folder called ‘data‘ and have identical directory structure inside), but the access to that folder has different routes on each machine (for instance, local directory is ‘/home/user/data‘ and the server is in ‘/mnt/data‘).

    This option will replace in the configuration, the access paths to the local machine for the server ones.

  • Relative paths: taking as origin the service configuration file (the mapfile if it is MapServer), you can set a route to resources from it using a ShapePath variable.

    From that file and adding the indicated for the ShapePath variable, the rest of the resources accesses will be built.

With this post, we finish with the series dedicated to the publishing extension (view 1 and 2),first add-on released on “On the road to gvSIG 2.2″.


Filed under: english, gvSIG Desktop, gvSIG development, testing Tagged: gvSIG 2.2, mapserver, publishing
Categories: OSGeo Planet

Free and Open Source GIS Ramblings: QGIS 2.8 LTR has landed

OSGeo Planet - Mon, 2015-03-02 20:53

qgisorg_banner28

It’s finally here! QGIS 2.8 LTR “Wien” is officially available for download now.

What’s an LTR

LTR stands for “Long Term Release”. This means that QGIS now has a system in place to provide a one-year stable release with backported bug fixes. The idea behind LTR is to have a stable platform for enterprises and organizations that don’t want update their software and training materials more often than once a year. To make the LTR a success, users and developers alike should be aware that bug fixes should be applied to both the LTR branch as well as the normal development branch. If you are interested in the details, you can find more info in the corresponding QGIS Enhancement Proposal.

Users who enjoy working with the cutting-edge version will be able to follow the regular four-monthly release cycle like last year.

What’s new?

This new version comes with many great new features which you can explore in the official visual changelog. It’s really hard to pick but my personal favorites are:

On the layer styling front, there are two great additions: raster image fills and a live heatmap renderer which makes it possible to create dynamic heatmaps on the fly.

raster image fill

Raster image fill symbol layer type

Another feature I’m sure many of you will enjoy is the support for custom prefixes for joins.

Custom join prefixes

Custom join prefixes

Last but not least, I want to point your attention to the great improvements to the rule-based legend which is now structured in a nice tree.

Rule-based renderer legend tree

Rule-based renderer legend tree

Don’t forget to check out the other new features!

Thanks!

None of this would have been possible without the great QGIS community and all the many different people involved in running the project. Thanks a lot to all of you and a special shout out for the sponsors! *applause*

sponsors


Categories: OSGeo Planet

Quantum GIS Polska: blog:duze_brawa_dla_agh

OSGeo Planet - Mon, 2015-03-02 20:02
Z prawdziwą przyjemnością informujemy, że Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza (Wydział Geologii, Geofizyki i Ochrony Środowiska) jest pierwszą uczelnią na świecie, która wsparła finansowo rozwój projektu QGIS jako oficjalny sponsor. Do tej pory projekt finansowały głównie firmy komercyjne oraz instytucje samorządowe wielu krajów.
Categories: OSGeo Planet

gvSIG Team: Libro “Cálculo de la erosión potencial del suelo con gvSIG”

OSGeo Planet - Mon, 2015-03-02 13:09

Disponible para descarga un nuevo libro de carácter práctico “Cálculo de la erosión potencial del suelo con gvSIG”, elaborado por Manuel Esteban Lucas Borja, Maria del Carmen Collado Corredor, de la Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos y de Montes (ETSIAM) de Albacete, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha.

El índice de ejercicios es:

- Obtención de la cuenca de estudio

- Factor R

- Factor K

- Factor LS

- Factor C

- Factor P

- Cálculo de la erosión potencial del suelo

Los autores han manifestado su deseo de recibir comentarios y aportaciones para mejorar el documento (los datos de contacto están disponibles en el propio libro).

Desde la Asociación gvSIG queremos agradecer esta nueva aportación y animar a otras universidades a seguir el ejemplo de liberar documentación relacionada con el proyecto gvSIG.


Filed under: gvSIG Desktop, spanish Tagged: erosión, libro, suelo
Categories: OSGeo Planet

Kartoza: How to create a QGIS PDF report with a few lines of python

OSGeo Planet - Sun, 2015-03-01 13:26

Sometimes you want to automatically generate a report to reflect the latest state of your data. For example you may be capturing spatial data into a PostGIS database and want a snapshot of that every few hours expressed as a pdf report. This example shows you how you can quickly generate a pdf based on a QGIS project (.qgs file) and a QGIS template (.qpt file).

Using this approach you can generate all kinds of useful outputs without ever needing to open QGIS each time you generate the report. Simply create the needed project and template files and then run it like this:

python generate_pdf.py
Categories: OSGeo Planet

NaturalGIS Blog: A QGIS plugin to run (common) spatial queries with PostGIS

OSGeo Planet - Sat, 2015-02-28 12:26

QGIS Processing toolbox is extremely flexible and it allows easily to implement QGIS tools (with a GUI) that are based on command line utilities (see this and this).

When the underlying command line program is ogr2ogr (or any other GDAL/OGR utility) possibilities become endeless. For example ogr2ogr can be used to convert formats or run arbitrary (Spatial) SQL queries.

One possibility is to run Spatial SQL queries using input PostGIS layers and getting as output a PostGIS layer. The intersting bit is that the Spatial SQL query will be run by the server/machine (where the input layers are stored), so possibly not by the destkop machine where you are running ogr2ogr.

Usually to run a (Spatial) SQL query in PostGIS a user would open one of the many SQL shells available (PgAdmin, QGIS DB Manager, phppgadmin, psql, etc.) and run something like the following:


CREATE TABLE dissolved AS
SELECT attribute1,(ST_Dump(ST_Union(a.geom))).geom::geometry(Polygon,4326) as geom
FROM input_table a
GROUP BY attribute1;

and that is ok for us geo-geeks, but what about average Jane/Joe?

Isn’t this much easier?

Dissolve PostGIS polygons Dissolve PostGIS polygons

With this plugin for the QGIS Processing toolbox (available in the official QGIS plugin repository) we aim to bring into QGIS a set of tools to allow basic PostGIS users to run common queries (Dissolve, Clip, Difference, etc.), using as input PostGIS layer and getting as output PostGIS layer(s).

PostGIS QGIS Processing tools PostGIS QGIS Processing tools

Please note that the plugin is still in the early stages of development and that it will be greatly improved once the Processing toolbox will support features like multi-attribute selection, adding to (QGIS) map output layers other than shapefiles, and others.

Categories: OSGeo Planet

NaturalGIS Blog: A QGIS plugin to run (common) spatial queries with PostGIS

OSGeo Planet - Sat, 2015-02-28 12:26

QGIS Processing toolbox is extremely flexible and it allows easily to implement QGIS tools (with a GUI) that are based on command line utilities (see this and this).

When the underlying command line program is ogr2ogr (or any other GDAL/OGR utility) possibilities become endeless. For example ogr2ogr can be used to convert formats or run arbitrary (Spatial) SQL queries.

One possibility is to run Spatial SQL queries using input PostGIS layers and getting as output a PostGIS layer. The intersting bit is that the Spatial SQL query will be run by the server/machine (where the input layers are stored), so possibly not by the destkop machine where you are running ogr2ogr.

Usually to run a (Spatial) SQL query in PostGIS a user would open one of the many SQL shells available (PgAdmin, QGIS DB Manager, phppgadmin, psql, etc.) and run something like the following:


CREATE TABLE dissolved AS
SELECT attribute1,(ST_Dump(ST_Union(a.geom))).geom::geometry(Polygon,4326) as geom
FROM input_table a
GROUP BY attribute1;

and that is ok for us geo-geeks, but what about average Jane/Joe?

Isn’t this much easier?

Dissolve PostGIS polygons Dissolve PostGIS polygons

With this plugin for the QGIS Processing toolbox (available in the official QGIS plugin repository) we aim to bring into QGIS a set of tools to allow basic PostGIS users to run common queries (Dissolve, Clip, Difference, etc.), using as input PostGIS layer and getting as output PostGIS layer(s).

PostGIS QGIS Processing tools PostGIS QGIS Processing tools

Please note that the plugin is still in the early stages of development and that it will be greatly improved once the Processing toolbox will support features like multi-attribute selection, adding to (QGIS) map output layers other than shapefiles, and others.

Categories: OSGeo Planet

Gis-Lab: Релиз GRASS 7.0.0

OSGeo Planet - Fri, 2015-02-27 23:54

На днях вышел долгожданный релиз новой стабильной версии GRASS под гордым номером 7.0.0!

За 6 лет напряжённой разработки было сделано около 100500 10500 исправлений и улучшений по сравнению с версией 6.4.0.

Среди основных особенностей релиза:

  • планируется длительная поддержка релиза (LTS);
  • графический интерфейс wxPython значительно доработан и дополнен многими новыми полезными функциями (например, т.н. «шторка»);
  • добавлено много нового функционала в ядро системы, в том числе, новый Python-интерфейс к С-библиотекам;
  • появилось множество новых модулей разного назначения, в том числе, не имеющий аналогов среди открытых ГИС фреймворк для работы с пространственно-временными наборами данных;
  • значительно ускорена работа модулей для работы с векторными данными; повсеместно реализована поддержка т.н. «больших данных»;
  • по умолчанию в качестве драйвера базы данных теперь SQLite (вместо DBF);
  • проделана большая работа по унификации и стандартизации названий параметров в модулях, а также по обновлению документации;
  • и много другого, нового и интересного :)

За подробностями, ссылками и документацией добро пожаловать на официальный сайт GRASS!

Categories: OSGeo Planet

NaturalGIS Blog: New geoprocessing tools in the QGIS Processing toolbox

OSGeo Planet - Fri, 2015-02-27 19:25

QGIS 2.8 was not officially announced yet and, as always happens in the QGIS project, new features are already being added to QGIS master, aka next future release, in this case 2.10.

At NaturalGIS we do our share of effort, especially regarding improvements for the QGIS “Processing” toolbox, and recently started to add new geoprocessing tools for vectors. At the time we are writing the tools we added are:

  • Buffer
  • Single sided buffer (or offset lines)
  • Clip by extent
  • Clip by polygon
  • Create points along lines
  • Dissolve
ogr2ogr geoprocessing tools for QGIS Processing toolbox New QGIS geoprocessing tools

Some are completely new, like the Single sided buffer (or offset lines), Clip (vector) by extent (a similar tool is already available in QGIS but only to clip rasters layers) and Create points along lines, others are not (Buffer, Clip by polygon and Dissolve) as there are already plenty of alternatives in QGIS. The point here is that this “new” tools are quite faster than the already existing QGIS counterparts, or they offer new options.

For example the “Dissolve” tool is on average several times faster (up to 7 times, in our simple tests) than the QGIS counterpart, moreover the tool has the ability to compute some statistics on numerical attributes. See the image below:

ogr2ogr geoprocessing Dissolve tool Dissolve with stats

Under the hood the work is done by that great software that is ogr2ogr. In this case is used to run spatial SQL queries, using as engine SQLite/Spatialite

More of this ogr2ogr/sql based tools will be added in the next future, especially when a few missing features will be added to the QGIS Processing toolbox, meanwhile you can help us testing the above ones.

Under MS Windows you can install the development version of QGIS using the OSGeo4W installer. Under Ubuntu GNU/Linux you can use the nightly builds repository.

Categories: OSGeo Planet

NaturalGIS Blog: New geoprocessing tools in the QGIS Processing toolbox

OSGeo Planet - Fri, 2015-02-27 19:25

QGIS 2.8 was not officially announced yet and, as always happens in the QGIS project, new features are already being added to QGIS master, aka next future release, in this case 2.10.

At NaturalGIS we do our share of effort, especially regarding improvements for the QGIS “Processing” toolbox, and recently started to add new geoprocessing tools for vectors. At the time we are writing the tools we added are:

  • Buffer
  • Single sided buffer (or offset lines)
  • Clip by extent
  • Clip by polygon
  • Create points along lines
  • Dissolve
ogr2ogr geoprocessing tools for QGIS Processing toolbox New QGIS geoprocessing tools

Some are completely new, like the Single sided buffer (or offset lines), Clip (vector) by extent (a similar tool is already available in QGIS but only to clip rasters layers) and Create points along lines, others are not (Buffer, Clip by polygon and Dissolve) as there are already plenty of alternatives in QGIS. The point here is that this “new” tools are quite faster than the already existing QGIS counterparts, or they offer new options.

For example the “Dissolve” tool is on average several times faster (up to 7 times, in our simple tests) than the QGIS counterpart, moreover the tool has the ability to compute some statistics on numerical attributes. See the image below:

ogr2ogr geoprocessing Dissolve tool Dissolve with stats

Under the hood the work is done by that great software that is ogr2ogr. In this case is used to run spatial SQL queries, using as engine SQLite/Spatialite

More of this ogr2ogr/sql based tools will be added in the next future, especially when a few missing features will be added to the QGIS Processing toolbox, meanwhile you can help us testing the above ones.

Under MS Windows you can install the development version of QGIS using the OSGeo4W installer. Under Ubuntu GNU/Linux you can use the nightly builds repository.

Categories: OSGeo Planet

NaturalGIS Blog: A new QGIS tool (based on ogr2ogr) to import vectors in PostGIS

OSGeo Planet - Fri, 2015-02-27 15:39

In QGIS there are many tools that can be used to import vectors inside a PostGIS database, each one has pros and cons:

  • SPIT core plugin: available since early QGIS releases but now unmaintained tool and therefore candidate to be removed from future QGIS releases. It has the advantage to allow import several vectors in one run, but on the other hand it does not have an option to launder table/columns names and is overall quite slow especially for fair large vectors.
  • DB Manager: it has several pros, like supporting drag & drop import and a few important other options, but misses to allow import several vectors and is overall slow especially for fair large vectors.
  • QGIS browser: it allows import vectors using drag & drop but as the above tools missed to allow multiple vectors import. Overall slow especially for fair large vectors.
  • Processing toolbox ”Import into PostGIS”: it can import several vectors at once because, as any other tool in the QGIS Processing toolbox, it can run in batch mode. Overall slow especially for fair large vectors.

There are of course also command line alternatives, in particular shp2pgsql (together with psql) and ogr2ogr. Each one is rich of options/switches and they can be scripted to import several vectors in one go. While shp2pgsql is installed were PostGIS is installed, usually it is not on common users desktop machines. On the other hand ogr2ogr is installed and available on any machine where QGIS is installed because is part of the GDAL/OGR libary, that is basic dependency of any QGIS installation.

We compared how importing vectors in PostGIS performed using ogr2ogr compared to the tools available in QGIS, and then also compared to shp2pgsql. In short, the results are the following:

  • even without recurring to any particular switch/trick, ogr2ogr is on average much more faster than any available tools available in QGIS.
  • ogr2ogr and shp2pgsql performed in a similar way.

To compare ogr2ogr and shp2pgsql we used as input dataset a 4 million features (polygons) shapefile (1.3GB of space occupied) and also a small subset of it (4000 features, 10MB) using PostGIS installed on the local machine (Ubuntu GNU/Linux 14.04).

Without using any particular switch to make imports faster (like “-D” for shp2pgsql or “-config PG_USE_COPY YES” for ogr2ogr) ogr2ogr is much faster than shp2pgsql/psql with the small dataset (2.5 seconds against 35 seconds).

With the large dataset things gets the other way, with shp2pgsql/psql ending the task in 17 minutes against 19.5 minutes with ogr2ogr.

Adding the options “-D” to shp2pgsql and “-config PG_USE_COPY YES” to ogr2ogr is possible to get a dramatic improvement of the performace of both tools: ogr2ogr takes 0.8 seconds to process the small dataset and 2.21 minutes the process the big dataset, while shp2pgsql/psql takes respectively 24 seconds and 1.56 minutes.

ogr2ogr seemed a good choice to create a new tool for QGIS to allow import vectors in a fast way. We implemented such tool as part of the QGIS Processing toolbox and therefore is available the brand new QGIS 2.8 release.

QGIS Processing tools to import vector layers in PostGIS The new tool(s) in the QGIS Processing toolbox

The tool also exposes options that are not usually available in any other QGIS tool. Aming the others: Vector dimensions, Append, Append and add new fields, Skip failures, Simplification, Densification, Import selected features by extent, Import clipped features by extent and a few others.

Tool GUI Tool GUI

Categories: OSGeo Planet

NaturalGIS Blog: A new QGIS tool (based on ogr2ogr) to import vectors in PostGIS

OSGeo Planet - Fri, 2015-02-27 15:39

In QGIS there are many tools that can be used to import vectors inside a PostGIS database, each one has pros and cons:

  • SPIT core plugin: available since early QGIS releases but now unmaintained tool and therefore candidate to be removed from future QGIS releases. It has the advantage to allow import several vectors in one run, but on the other hand it does not have an option to launder table/columns names and is overall quite slow especially for fair large vectors.
  • DB Manager: it has several pros, like supporting drag & drop import and a few important other options, but misses to allow import several vectors and is overall slow especially for fair large vectors.
  • QGIS browser: it allows import vectors using drag & drop but as the above tools missed to allow multiple vectors import. Overall slow especially for fair large vectors.
  • Processing toolbox ”Import into PostGIS”: it can import several vectors at once because, as any other tool in the QGIS Processing toolbox, it can run in batch mode. Overall slow especially for fair large vectors.

There are of course also command line alternatives, in particular shp2pgsql (together with psql) and ogr2ogr. Each one is rich of options/switches and they can be scripted to import several vectors in one go. While shp2pgsql is installed were PostGIS is installed, usually it is not on common users desktop machines. On the other hand ogr2ogr is installed and available on any machine where QGIS is installed because is part of the GDAL/OGR libary, that is basic dependency of any QGIS installation.

We compared how importing vectors in PostGIS performed using ogr2ogr compared to the tools available in QGIS, and then also compared to shp2pgsql. In short, the results are the following:

  • even without recurring to any particular switch/trick, ogr2ogr is on average much more faster than any available tools available in QGIS.
  • ogr2ogr and shp2pgsql performed in a similar way.

To compare ogr2ogr and shp2pgsql we used as input dataset a 4 million features (polygons) shapefile (1.3GB of space occupied) and also a small subset of it (4000 features, 10MB) using PostGIS installed on the local machine (Ubuntu GNU/Linux 14.04).

Without using any particular switch to make imports faster (like “-D” for shp2pgsql or “-config PG_USE_COPY YES” for ogr2ogr) ogr2ogr is much faster than shp2pgsql/psql with the small dataset (2.5 seconds against 35 seconds).

With the large dataset things gets the other way, with shp2pgsql/psql ending the task in 17 minutes against 19.5 minutes with ogr2ogr.

Adding the options “-D” to shp2pgsql and “-config PG_USE_COPY YES” to ogr2ogr is possible to get a dramatic improvement of the performace of both tools: ogr2ogr takes 0.8 seconds to process the small dataset and 2.21 minutes the process the big dataset, while shp2pgsql/psql takes respectively 24 seconds and 1.56 minutes.

ogr2ogr seemed a good choice to create a new tool for QGIS to allow import vectors in a fast way. We implemented such tool as part of the QGIS Processing toolbox and therefore is available the brand new QGIS 2.8 release.

QGIS Processing tools to import vector layers in PostGIS The new tool(s) in the QGIS Processing toolbox

The tool also exposes options that are not usually available in any other QGIS tool. Aming the others: Vector dimensions, Append, Append and add new fields, Skip failures, Simplification, Densification, Import selected features by extent, Import clipped features by extent and a few others.

Tool GUI Tool GUI

Categories: OSGeo Planet

Tyler Mitchell: VIDEO: Kibana 3 Dashboard – 3 Use Cases Demonstrated

OSGeo Planet - Fri, 2015-02-27 04:23

Kibana dashboards, from the Elasticsearch project, can help you visualise activity and incidents in log files. Here I show 3 different types of use cases for dashboards and how each can be used to answer different questions depending on the person.  Video and details follow.

Text Search Dashboard

The first example is the simplest UI I could imagine: a query/search box, a histogram, and a table.  In this instance any user, at any level of curiosity, can find textual data in the logs using a keyword match.

 Text Search

Then they can also see the relative number of records that occur at given times within the time window of all the data available.  These are aggregate counts of all records that have some match to the query keyword or algebra.

Likewise, the table reflects the subset of data provided by the records, with the ability to only show fields of interest.

Process Details

A slightly more advanced use is to focus on a particular process (i.e. application) running on a machine that’s being logged.  Here we can then take a particular metric, i.e. CPU usage, and graph it instead of just a simple histogram.

 Process Details

A typical user may be in charge of a particular set of services in a system.  Here they can see how they perform and yet still dig into the details as desired.

I also do some cool “markers” to subtly show when events coincide with other process metrics.

All Events

The data example shown here has process, performance and event logging information.  I combine multiple queries and having them drive different parts of the dashboard – a pie chart, summary table, histogram, sparkline and other charts based on numeric data.

 All Events

These can then all be filtered based on time windows that are interactively selected.  This is really the typical picture of a dashboard – giving more densely packed information about a variety of metrics, ideal for system managers to get a handle on things.

Streaming Pipeline

The data are generated by Windows servers using a custom C# application that pushes data in a Kafka topic in a Hadoop cluster running in EC2. The data stream is then read from the topic using Actian DataFlow platform and pushed into Elasticsearch for Kibana to use at the end of the pipeline.  There are other reasons I have this kind of pipeline – namely that DataFlow can simultaneously also feed other outgoing part of the pipeline – RDBMS, graph, etc.   More on that in a future video/post.

Next Steps
  • My next plans are to show you Kibana version 4 in action, replicating some of what I’ve shown here.
  • If you haven’t seen it already, see this link and my video with some tips and tricks for using Kibana 3.
  • Tell me more about your interests in dashboards and I’ll consider focusing on them too.

The post VIDEO: Kibana 3 Dashboard – 3 Use Cases Demonstrated appeared first on spatialguru.com.

Categories: OSGeo Planet

BostonGIS: PostGIS workshops at FOSS4G NA 2015 San Francisco

OSGeo Planet - Fri, 2015-02-27 00:04

There will be two PostGIS workshops at FOSS4G NA 2015 on March 9th. Signup if you haven't already.

  • PostGIS Up and Running 9AM - 12 PM. This is an introductory workshop where we'll cover the basics of configuring PostGIS and using the PostGIS geometry and geography types. We also plan to demonstrate some new features coming in PostGIS 2.2, particularly of the 3D kind. If time permitting, we'll do a quick coverage of pgRouting as well.

    Someone asked on IRC if we will be handing out certificates of completion to folks who complete the workshop. Some people need this because they are allowed to attend workshops on company time, but not conferences. The thought hadn't crossed our mind, but we like the idea a lot. So yes you can have a certificate if you stay thru the whole session complete with Regina and Leo's seal of approval. We might even have some door prizes.

  • Advanced spatial analysis with PostGIS. Pierre Racine will be leading this workshop. Expect to be blown away by images of rasters dancing on legs of geometries. He'll also have some other cool advanced spatial analysis stuff beyond raster. Expect a lot of geometry processing tricks in this one.

Sadly I think our PostGIS In Action 2ed is going to be released a little after conference time and probably won't be ready until mid March, so probably just a wee bit too late for FOSS4G NA 2015, but just in time for PGCon.US New York 2015 March 25th-26th . Final book proofing is like getting our teeth pulled. I really hope it's worth the wait. We'll have coupons but no book. We will have some copies of our PostgreSQL: Up and Running 2nd Edition available though. If you've already bought one of our books and want it autographed, bring it along on your trip.

Categories: OSGeo Planet

SourcePole: QGIS Instant Print Plugin

OSGeo Planet - Thu, 2015-02-26 21:52

As a side product of a customer project, we’re publishing a QGIS plugin for printing maps to a file with just two mouse clicks.

To use the instant print tool, a composer needs to be created first. The only requirement is that it contains exactly one map item.

The instant print tool can then be activated from the plugin toolbar by clicking on the plugin icon icon.

In the dialog window which appears, one can pick the composer to use as page layout. A selection rectangle is displayed in the map canvas, sized according to the size of the map item in the composer and the scale chosen in the instant print dialog. The selection rectangle can be freely dragged around to choose the region one wishes to print. When dragging the selection rectangle, the previous rectangle is shown shaded and can be used as a snap reference when setting the new region. While the instant print tool is active, the canvas can be panned with the middle mouse button.

screenshot

To instant print tool can be installed with the QGIS plugin manager and the sources are available on Github.

Categories: OSGeo Planet

Tyler Mitchell: Google wants “mobile-friendly” – fix your WordPress site

OSGeo Planet - Thu, 2015-02-26 21:46

TheNextWeb reports: “Google will begin ranking mobile-friendly sites higher starting April 21“.  It’s always nice having advance warning, so use it wisely – here’s how to tweak WordPress to increase your mobile-friendliness.

Google Mobile-Friendly Check

I use a self hosted WordPress site and wanted to make sure it was ready for action.  I already thought it was, because I’ve accessed in on a mobile device very often and it worked okay.

I even went onto the Google Web Admin tools and the mobile usability check said things were fine.

Google admin tool says mobile check is okay

However, all was not golden when I ran the Google mobile-friendly checker.  (Obviously two different apps here, hopefully those will merge.)

Google mobile check failure

Try it here, now!  The complaints about were that some content is wider than screens and that links were too close together.  Fair enough.

WordPress Mobile-Friendly Activation

If you’re not already using WordPress’s Jetpack features, you’re really missing out.  I use it mostly for monitoring stats but there are several other features that make it very useful, including one called Mobile Theme.

  1. From the admin sidebar select Jetpack (install it first if not already enabled).  It will show you some suggested plugins to enable, plus show you a search bar to find others.
  2. Enter “mobile” and click on the Mobile Theme item.
  3. Activate it (lower-right corner button).
  4. And you’re done!

Going back to Google’s checker it shows a different preview now and also says things are fine.  Looking at the site after making these changes, it’s obviously better.

Google mobile check fixed success

However, I still have one plugin (Crayon markup) that helps display code samples that seems to force some posts to wider than the screen.  I assume the plugin creators will fix that up, but it’s not too bad at this point.  Unless Google complains, it doesn’t matter anyway!

The post Google wants “mobile-friendly” – fix your WordPress site appeared first on spatialguru.com.

Categories: OSGeo Planet

Cameron Shorter: OSGeo-Live 8.5 released

OSGeo Planet - Thu, 2015-02-26 20:21
Version 8.5 of the OSGeo-Live GIS software collection has been released, featuring over 50 open source, standards compliant geospatial applications.
Release HighlightsAdded Cesium
Cesium is a JavaScript library for creating 3D globes and 2D maps in a web browser without any plugins. It uses WebGL for hardware-accelerated graphics, and is cross-platform, cross-browser, and tuned for dynamic-data visualization.

Added IPython
IPython notebooks contain a list of input/output cells which can contain code, text, mathematics, plots, maps and other media. They are a bit like a spreadsheet in that each cell can contain code or a formula, and a bit like a web page in that authors can create structured text along with easily embedding rich and sophisticated media.

Updated to GRASS 7
GRASS 7 is a major upgrade, in the making since 2008, and offers new modules, tools, analysis capabilities, optimisations, user interface improvements, new Python interface, and SQLite database driver as default.

Updated to OpenLayers 3
OpenLayers 3 is a fundamental redesign of the OpenLayers web mapping library to use modern design patterns. Applications 25 geospatial programs have been updated to newer versions.
About OSGeo-Live OSGeo-Live is a self-contained bootable DVD, USB flash drive and Virtual Machine, pre-installed with robust open source geospatial software, which can be trialled without installing anything. It includes:
  • Over 50 quality geospatial Open Source applications installed and pre-configured
  • Free world maps and sample datasets
  • Project Overview and step-by-step Quickstart for each application
  • Lightning presentation of all applications, along with speaker's script
  • Overviews of key OGC standards
  • Translations to multiple languages
Homepage: http://live.osgeo.org
Download details: http://live.osgeo.org/en/download.html
CreditsOver 180 people have directly helped with OSGeo-Live packaging, documenting and translating, and thousands have been involved in building the packaged software.
Developers, packagers, documenters and translators include:
Activity Workshop, Agustín Dí­ez, Aikaterini Kapsampeli, Alan Beccati, Alan Boudreault, Alessandro Furieri, Alexander Bruy, Alexander Kleshnin, Alexander Muriy, Alexandre Dube, Alexey Ardyakov, Alex Mandel, Amy Gao, Andrea Antonello, Andrea Yanza, Andrey Syrokomskiy, Andry Rustanto, Angelos Tzotsos, Anna Muñoz, Antonio Falciano, Antonio Santiago, Anton Novichikhin, Anton Patrushev, Argyros Argyridis, Ariel Núñez, Assumpció Termens, Astrid Emde, Balasubramaniam Natarajan, Barry Rowlingson, Benjamin Pross, Brian Hamlin, Bruno Binet, Bu Kun, Cameron Shorter, Christophe Tufféry, Christos Iossifidis, Cristhian Pin, Damian Wojsław, Dane Springmeyer, Daniel Kastl, Danilo Bretschneider, Daria Svidzinska, David Mateos, Denis Rykov, Diego González, Diego Migliavacca, Dimitar Misev, Dmitry Baryshnikov, Dominik Helle, Edgar Soldin, Eike Hinderk Jürrens, Elena Mezzini, Eric Lemoine, Erika Pillu, Estela Llorente, Etienne Delay, Etienne Dube, Evgeny Nikulin, Fabian Schindler, Fran Boon, François Prunayre, Frank Gasdorf, Frank Warmerdam, Friedjoff Trautwein, Gavin Treadgold, Giuseppe Calamita, Grald Fenoy, Grigory Rozhentsov, Guy Griffiths, Hamish Bowman, Haruyuki Seki, Henry Addo, Hernan Olivera, Hirofumi Hayashi, Howard Butler, Hyeyeong Choe, Ian Edwards, Ian Turton, Ilya Filippov, Jackie Ng, Jan Drewnak, Jane Lewis, Javier Rodrigo, Javier Sánchez, Jesús Gómez, Jim Klassen, Jing Wang, Jinsongdi Yu, Jody Garnett, Johan Van de Wauw, John Bryant, Jorge Arévalo, Jorge Sanz, José Antonio Canalejo, José Vicente Higón, Judit Mays, Klokan Petr Pridal, Ko Nagase, Kristof Lange, kuzkok, Lance McKee, Larry Shaffer, Lars Lingner, Luca Delucchi, Lucía Sanjaime, Mage Whopper, Manuel Grizonnet, Marc-André Barbeau, Marco Curreli, Marco Puppin, Marc Torres, Margherita Di Leo, Maria Vakalopoulou, Mario Andino, Mark Leslie, Massimo Di Stefano, Matteo De Stefano, Matthias Streulens, Mauricio Miranda, Mauricio Pazos, Maxim Dubinin, Michaël Michaud, Michael Owonibi, Micha Silver, Mike Adair, Milena Nowotarska, M Iqnaul Haq Siregar, Nacho Varela, Nadiia Gorash, Nathaniel V. Kelso, Ned Horning, Nobusuke Iwasaki, Oliver Tonnhofer, Òscar Fonts, Otto Dassau, Pasquale Di Donato, Patric Hafner, Paul Meems, Pavel, Pedro-Juan Ferrer, Pirmin Kalberer, Raf Roset, Regina Obe, Ricardo Pinho, Roald de Wit, Roberta Fagandini, Roberto Antolin, Roberto Antolí­n, Roger Veciana, Ruth Schoenbuchner, Samuel Mesa, Scott Penrose, Sergey Grachev, Sergey Popov, Sergio Baños, Simon Cropper, Simon Pigot, Stefan A. Tzeggai, Stefan Hansen, Stefan Steiniger, Stephan Meissl, Steve Lime, Takayuki Nuimura, Thierry Badard, Thomas Baschetti, Thomas Gratier, Tom Kralidis, Toshikazu Seto, Trevor Wekel, Valenty González, Vera, Xianfeng Song, Yoichi Kayama, Zhengfan Lin, Zoltan Siki
Sponsoring organisations
Categories: OSGeo Planet
Syndicate content